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Frequently asked questions

Have a question about Waikanae Beach community futures?

Questions on Waikanae Beach community futures process

Why is the Waikanae Beach community futures work being done?

What is a community futures process?

What does the process involve?

Who can participate in the process?

How can I participate in the Waikanae Beach community futures process?

How long does the community futures process take?

What were the drop-in sessions?

What was the report back session?

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Questions on planning and zoning

How can I check if anyone is considering a new commercial activity in the Waikanae Beach area?

How is Waikanae Beach currently zoned?

What activities are permitted for each zone?

What is the zoning of land around the Expressway – Te Moana Road interchange area?

How high can buildings be in Waikanae Beach?

 

 Questions on Waikanae Beach community futures process

Why is the Waikanae Beach community futures work being done?

Some residents and property owners at Waikanae Beach are concerned about how future development in their neighbourhood will be managed, particularly as a result of the expressway, and have sought council’s help. 

To help support the Waikanae Beach community respond proactively and positively to the potential impacts of the expressway with its nearby Te Moana Road interchange, we are facilitating a community futures process. 

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What is a community futures process?

The community futures process is a facilitated, collaborative process.

During the process we work closely with the community to help the community develop a shared vision for their neighbourhood.  The process is similar to the one used to develop local outcomes statements between 2006 and 2010.

It is likely some of the community’s aspirations that are identified during the community futures process will be in the community’s power to make happen.  Others may be able to be achieved by council, for example through plan changes.

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What does the process involve?

A consultative process is used to help the community decide what it wants for Waikanae Beach. 

Through the community futures process, members of the community define the issues, listen to the arguments of others, have their own say and potentially arrive at solutions which all, or the great majority, can live with. 

The process involves a number of steps including:

  1. community identification of aspirations and issues
  2. information gathering and sharing by community and council
  3. community discussion of information and issues
  4. development of options
  5. evaluation of options
  6. decision making.

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Who can participate in the process?

The Waikanae Beach community futures process is to help support the Waikanae Beach community respond proactively and positively to the potential impacts of the expressway.  It is important the views of Waikanae Beach residents and property-owners take priority over those of non-residents.

Non-residents who want to contribute to aspects of the area they have a stake in can use the usual channels to make those views known, including contacting council or contributing to formal consultations on the Long Term Plan and District Plan changes and any other consultations which may be run.  They may also attend meetings being held in relation to the Waikanae Beach community futures process. However, their views may not necessarily be taken into account.

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How can I participate in the Waikanae Beach community futures process?

There are a number of ways in which you can participate: through meetings, email, report backs and consultation events.

If you can’t attend any of these meetings, have questions, or would like to keep in touch with this process or be included in our mailing list for Waikanae Beach community futures email updates, please email: waikanaebeach@kapiticoast.govt.nz

You can also stay up-to-date with Council news by signing up to our weekly Everything Kāpiti e-newsletter.

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How long does the community futures process take?

Because this process usually generates a wide range of viewpoints and options – the challenge is to identify those which the majority of the community can live with and those which it can discard.

The more far reaching the discussion and the longer it takes the community to reach a shared vision, potentially the greater the time needed.  Needless to say, the sooner the community can arrive at a decision, the quicker the process.

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What were the drop-in sessions?

In September 2015, we started the Waikanae Beach community futures process by holding two drop-in information sessions. These were held on the afternoon of Sunday 6 September and the evening of Tuesday 22 September – at the Waikanae Beach Hall and the Waikanae Boating Club respectively. A total of around 270 people attended these.

The purpose of these sessions was to get people to start identifying their aspirations for Waikanae Beach.  People could drop-in anytime over a two-hour period and have conversations with council planning and regulatory staff, as well as identify and write down what they value and their aspirations for Waikanae Beach, and any issues they think might impact on Waikanae Beach’s future.

We have posted this information and the themes that were raised at these sessions on our website, and have sent it to people on the Waikanae Beach community futures email distribution list. Please note comments have not been attributed to individuals.

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What was the report back session?

The Waikanae Beach Community Futures Working Group held a report back session on Sunday 10 July 2016 at the Waikanae Beach Hall on Rauparaha Street to update the community on their work - more than 200 locals attended.

More than 200 locals turned out to hear what the Working Group members had to say and provided feedback on the Working Group’s draft community vision for Waikanae Beach.

Questions on planning and Zoning

How can I check if anyone is considering a new commercial activity in the Waikanae Beach area?

The first place to look is on our website, where we keep:

Any development, subdivision or other proposed use of a site must be assessed against the District Plan's provisions.

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How is Waikanae Beach currently zoned?

Under our current District Plan, there are five zones in Waikanae Beach:

  1. Residential zone
  2. Commercial/retail zone
  3. Rural zone
  4. Open space zone
  5. Ngarara zone.

A zone is an area for which rules and standards set out in the District Plan apply across the stated zone. The planning maps show the extent of the zones.

This map (Districtwide and Urban Plan Zones and Features Map 6)  shows the geographic location of the five zones in the Waikanae Beach area.

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What activities are permitted for each zone?

Permitted activities vary for each zone and can be found in Volume 1 of the District Plan - Part D - Rules and Standards.

If you have any queries relating to permitted activities, phone 04 296 4700 or toll free 0800 486 486 and ask for the Duty Planner. Alternatively, email: resource.consents@kapiticoast.govt.nz

 

What is the zoning of land around the Expressway – Te Moana Road interchange area?

This map shows you the current District Plan zoning of the land around the designated Te Moana Road expressway interchange area. 

The land in the immediate vicinity of the designated Expressway – Te Moana interchange area is zoned rural.

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How high can buildings be in Waikanae Beach?

The permitted height of buildings for Waikanae Beach depends on the zoning.

The current maximum permitted building heights are:

  • Residential zone: 8 metres
  • Commercial/retail zone: 12 metres (and no more than 3 storeys)
  • Open space zone: 4 metres  

Note: Buildings must also meet the height in relation to property boundary and yard requirements for the zone to be a permitted activity. Also note that resource consent could be sought for any building exceeding the permitted activity height, breaching yards or other standards.

Click here to view presentation material from the 10 July 2016 report back.

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