Your Council

District Plan FAQs

What's in the District Plan?

Why are District Plans important?

Why should I be interested in the District Plan?

How do I know if my planned activity is allowed?

What is a resource consent?

What is the difference between Council's various plans?

 

What is in the District Plan?

The District Plan includes objectives and policies that state Council’s goals in dealing with environmental issues. The plan includes rules to help Council achieve those goals by specifying what can and can’t be done without a resource consent, and standards that must be adhered to.

District maps show future land use designations and the district’s zoning:   

  • Residential
  • Rural
  • Commercial/ Retail 
  • Retail
  • Paraparaumu Town Centre
  • Industrial / service
  • Open Space
  • River Corridor
  • Conservation
  • Airport 
  • Waikanae North Development Zone
  • Ngarara Zone

Why are District Plans important?

Everyone is affected by the District Plan because it helps shape how we live, work and play in Kāpiti. Its policies are designed to ensure the environment, and the things people love about living in Kāpiti, are protected. 

No-one can use land in a way that contravenes the District Plan – even visitors may be affected by rules relating to rubbish disposal, hazard management, noise, etc.

Why should I be interested in the District Plan?

The District Plan plays a big part in how Kapiti develops, addressing such diverse issues as character, amenity, heritage and landscape, open spaces, urban growth, subdivision and coastal management.

You may be interested in big picture aspects of the District Plan or just what you can and can’t do on your property – whether it be subdividing, renovating, building a new garage or deck, or starting a home business.

How do I know if my planned activity is allowed?

Check the District Plan to see how your proposed activity is classified:   

  • Permitted - with standards outlining how the activity must be done
  • Controlled - requires resource consent but will be approved if meets standards
  • Restricted discretionary - Council has discretion over certain matters, i.e. design, in terms of deciding whether to grant a resource consent
  • Discretionary - effects will be assessed and resource consent granted or declined on a case by case basis
  • Non-complying - resource consent granted only under exceptional circumstances
  • Prohibited

Once you have approval you need to ensure your activity is undertaken within the plan’s rules and standards.

What is a resource consent? 

Activities not allowed as of right on your land may be prohibited or require a resource consent (authorisation) to proceed. Resource consents may be notified or non-notified.

What is the difference between the Council's various plans?

Put very simply, Community Outcomes are the community’s aspirations for the district; the Long Term Plan summarises Council activities and expenditure; and the District Plan manages land use and development.