alert
19 Jul: Online dog registration form currently down. Dog registration info

City Nature Challenge 2023 – Te Upoko o te Ika

17 Apr 2023, 10:25 AM

City Nature Challenge is an annual international event that encourages people around the world to find and record wildlife in their cities, districts or regions. Areas compete to see which one can log the most nature observations on iNaturalist, an app that allows you to record what you see, share your findings and discuss with others.

This year, districts across the Wellington region, including Kāpiti, are teaming up to turn our residents into citizen scientists for a four-day hunt, Friday 28 April – Monday 1 May 2023, for as many species as possible.


Got to catch ‘em all

It’s easy to get involved using the iNaturalist app (free on the app store). Just join the Wellington City Nature Challenge group and log sightings of wild plants, creatures, or organisms, living or dead, on the land, in the sea, from the coast to the hills, and even in your backyard.

All (and only) observations made starting 12am Friday 28 April 2023 (NZ local time) and up to 11.59pm Monday 1 May 2023 will count for the City Nature Challenge.


What’s happening in Kāpiti?

To support the City Nature Challenge, we are hosting an in-person drop-in session on Wednesday 26 April 3.30-4.30pm at Russell Reserve, Waikanae for some practical tips on how to use the iNaturalist app. This will be followed by an online training session for our local conservation and restoration groups on from 5.30pm-7pm.

Keen to get involved? Email [email protected] to RSVP.

On Saturday 29 April from 10am–12pm, mini bioblitz meet up will be held at Russell Reserve for registered participants who need help with troubleshooting.


Logging nature is important mahi

By getting our communities to actively connect with nature and the environment, they can start to see how unique the biodiversity in Kāpiti is, and how and why it is all worth protecting.

The data that is gathered can also assist scientists with conservation monitoring and research – and can even lead to the discovery of new species!